terezi-owns2:

THE LITTLE KID NEXT DOOR JSUT OPENED HIS WINDOW AND YELLED “WHAT IS 27 PLUS 4” AND I YELLED “IT’S 31” AND HE SAID “THANK YOU GOD LADY” IM LAUGIHNG

tacobelligerent:

tacobelligerent:

I STEPPED ON A FUCKING LEAF AND AT THE SAME TIME SOME KID SCREAMED I THOUGHT IT WAS THE FUCKIN LEAF OMG

why do we always have to reblog my mistakes

2srooky:

Holy shit my bicep has been killing me all day and my best friend just grabbed my arm and started rubbing my bicep chanting “ayyyyyyyy narutooooooooo” and my arm feels 100% better wtf kinda pain no jutsu is this what the fuck.

a heart-shaped meadow, created by a farmer as a tribute to his late wife.

captainarlert:

I wanna write something so good people stay up till three in the morning writing theories and head canons about it.

tubbytubby2x4:

Anyone who has bad posture or slumped shoulders should do this 20 minute workout at least 3 times a week! It’s designed to build the muscles in your back and shoulders to improve your posture. Don’t worry about doing it all perfectly. It’s more important that you go through the motions. Over time, the more you do it, the better you’ll become.

It’s also okay to take a rest if you feel you need to, but remember that the burning, hot feeling in your muscles is actually really good, and you should keep going at least a few more seconds when you start to feel that.

In general, I think we need to move away from the premise that being a good person is a fixed immutable characteristic and shift towards seeing being good as a practice. And it is a practice that we carry out by engaging with our imperfections. We need to shift towards thinking that being a good person is like being a clean person. Being a clean person is something you maintain and work on every day.We don’t assume ‘I am a clean person therefore I don’t need to brush my teeth.’ When someone suggests to us that we have something stuck in our teeth we don’t say to them ‘What do you mean I have something stuck in my teeth—but I’m a clean person?!’

Jay Smooth in his TED speech “how I learned to stop worrying and love discussing race” (via tropicanastasia)

Jay Smooth almost always a reblog

(via unrational)

Dude nailed it. We all need to work at being good. Even if we think we are.

(via jasmined)

It’s difficult for me to relate to this sort of perspective switch because my culture’s idea of a good person comes from this perspective. In Judaism it is never enough to envision yourself as a good person; everyone has inclinations of good and evil within them, and it is only through action that we manifest ourselves in the world at large, and only through action that we can self-correct when we make mistakes—even if that action is changing how we think.  I find it jarring when I am reminded that not every culture teaches goodness this way.

(via chelonaut)

thecraftychemist:

sciencealert:

Teenager from India invents device that can convert breath to speech: http://bit.ly/1m7yTBo

This is amazing:

Sixteen-year-old Arsh Shah Dilbagi has developed a new technology called ‘TALK’, which is a cheap and portable device to help people who are physically incapable of speaking express themselves. Right now, 1.4 percent of the world’s population has very limited or no speech, due to conditions such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), locked-in syndrome (LIS), Encephalopathy (SEM), Parkinson’s disease, and paralysis. So that’s literally a group of people that could match the entire population of Germany, and all of them unable to speak.

Stephen Hawking has a device to help him communicate, but it’s extremely expensive, costing several thousand dollars, and is also quite bulky. What Dilbagi has managed to do is invent a device that achieves the same thing, but can be purchased for just $80.

The way TALK works is that it’s able to translate the user’s breath into electric signals using a special device called a MEMS Microphone. This technology is composed of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm etched directly into a silicon chip, and an amplifying device to increase the sound of the user’s breath.

By expelling two types of breaths into the device, with different intensities and timing, the user is able to spell out words in Morse code. “A microprocessor then interprets the breathes into dots and dashes, converting them into words. The words are then sent to a second microprocessor that synthesises them into voice,” says Whitney Mallett at Motherboard. “The morse code can either be translated into English, or specific commands and phrases. The device features nine different voices varying in age and gender.”

THEME